Archive for March, 2015

Wood Stork Feeding Strategy

This past January I had the privilege of joining Jeff Bouton, Raymond VanBuskirk, and Rafael Galvez at the Space Coast Birding & Wildlife Festival in Titusville, Florida. For this Coloradan the change in climate was welcomed, but even more awesome for me was the chance to spend quality time with birds I […]

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Birth of a Birder

How do you get a five-year-old interested in birds? Tell him the scientific name of American Robin. Hilarity will ensue. I promise. Earlier this year I took a trip east to visit my brother and his family. My nephews Freddy and Benny are eight and five. Since we live across the country […]

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Rich Hearn: Tracking the Spoon-billed Sandpiper

Rich heads up WWT’s species monitoring team and chairs the Wetlands International/IUCN-SSC Duck Specialist Group. He joined WWT in 1995 after taking part in an expedition to Argentina to look for Brazilian mergansers. He has since taken part in waterbird surveys and research and helped set up monitoring programmes all […]

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Spring Has Sprung

The thought of spring may seem like a fairy tale for those in the Northern US buried under record amounts of February and March snowfalls, but here in sunny Florida, spring has definitely sprung and believe it or not, it’s coming your way! The first migrants to return to Florida each „spring“ are the Purple […]

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Monitoring Migrations in Israel

Hello from sunny Eilat, Israel! I’m out here this spring taking part in the intensive bird monitoring efforts put on by the Israeli Ornithological Center, and the International Birding and Research Center, Eilat. I’m participating in the survey side of things, rather than the banding (ringing for all of our […]

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Colorful or Cryptic?

From California to Mexico, Leica team member Steve Howell has recently been contemplating the beauty and plumage patterns of some ‘colorful’ birds… We all know about nightjars and bitterns having cryptic plumage, even green parrots in green trees. But some other species, when seen in a field guide, don’t seem […]

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